Finding Jack Charlton reveals ‘difficult’ relationship with England hero brother Bobby as pair grew apart over wife spat

A DOCUMENTARY portraying Jack Charlton's remarkable life revealed the difficult relationship with his brother.

Finding Jack Charlton, which was aired on Monday, relived the Leeds United legend's life both on and off the field.

Jack died aged 85 in July after suffering from lymphoma and dementia.

During his illustrious career he won two league titles with Leeds, the FA Cup and League Cup and, of course, the historic World Cup in 1966.

Jack is also a hero in Ireland after helping them qualify for their first World Cup as a manager in 1990 in which 500,000 fans welcomed them back onto Irish soil in Dublin after their knockout.

But his relationship with Manchester United legend Sir Bobby, who was two years his junior, suffered after they fell out in 1996.

Jack accused Bobby of not visiting their mother Cissie before her death in the same year.

Bobby, who won the Ballon d'Or in 1966, would reveal his wife Norma and Cissie had a falling out and he opted to take the side of his other half.

During the documentary, it was revealed how they had different interests from a young age.

In a previous recording, Jack said: "I had to look after him during the day and make sure he was okay. I didn't like it. I liked the sea, I liked the countryside and Bobby didn't. 

"He liked to be around my mother, he liked to be at home. I could have done more things without him than I had to do with him." 

In 2007, Bobby spoke of their tumultuous relationship after claiming Jack said some 'absolutely disgraceful' comments abouts his wife.


Bobby told the Guardian: "[Jack] came out in the newspapers saying things about my wife that were absolutely disgraceful. Nonsense.

"Ask anybody that ever met my wife: 'hoity-toity' is not a word they'd use.

"My brother made a big mistake. I don't understand why he did it. He couldn't possibly have known her and said what he said. I was astonished."

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