Army of Fallen heroes: Silhouettes of 100 British Tommies and 25 Indian soldiers stand guard around Hampton Court Palace in striking WWI memorial in aid of Poppy Appeal

  • Some 125 silhouette soldiers were hand-made from scrap metal by Oxfordshire-based artist Dan Barton
  • Mr Barton has raised more than £65,000 for the Royal British Legion by crafting thousands of soldiers
  • The soldiers have been placed on the grounds of Hampton Court Palace alongside 75 giant poppy wreaths

An army of 125 silhouette soldiers have been placed on the grounds of Hampton Court Palace ahead of Armistice Day. 

The 6ft soldiers in Hampton Court, west London, were hand-made from scrap metal collected by Dan Barton ahead of this year’s Poppy Appeal. 

In Hampton Court’s East Front Gardens 75 giant poppy wreaths have been placed alongside 100 Tommies and 25 Indian soldiers to represent forces from across the Empire.

The display, created as part of the ‘Standing with Giants’ project, is to represent almost 1800 Indian soldiers who sailed to Britain in 1919 to take part in the World War I peace parade in London and were encamped on the grounds of Hampton Court for the duration of their stay

They will be displayed in the palace grounds from November 3 to 28.  

The outdoor remembrance display includes 25 newly commissioned near-life-sized silhouettes of Indian soldiers from World War I alongside 100 British soldiers

The soldiers are displayed at Hampton Court Palace, in south west London

Alongside 100 British soldiers, 25 Indian men were placed on the grounds to represent the impact of foreign forces on the war

The display has been placed on the grounds of Hampton Court Palace in west London

Some 101 soldier silhouettes were placed on a hillside beside the M40 near Stokenchuch, Bucks, in 2019. Around 10,000 people stopped at the site and £25,000 was raised, Mr Barton added

The silhouettes have been dotted around the gardens in a dramatic display to raise money 

The artist, who restores buildings for a living, placed 200 silhouettes at Blenheim Palace in Oxforshire last year. It attracted 25,000 visitors in two weeks and raised £40,000 for the Poppy Appeal

Mr Barton has raised more than £65,000 for the Royal British Legion by displaying the cutouts over the last two years.

He made a handful of the soldiers in 2018 to mark 100 years since the end of World War One – raising a total of £1,200 after displaying them in his Oxfordshire village.

He told the Sun: ‘I’m passionate about remembering those poor souls who fought for our freedom. Every one of us has our freedom at the price of someone who made the ultimate sacrifice. That is who we are honouring.’

Some 101 soldier silhouettes were placed on a hillside beside the M40 near Stokenchuch, Bucks, in 2019. Around 10,000 people stopped at the site and £25,000 was raised, Mr Barton added.

The artist, who restores buildings for a living, placed 200 silhouettes at Blenheim Palace in Oxforshire last year. It attracted 25,000 visitors in two weeks and raised £40,000 for the Poppy Appeal.  

A Hampton Court Palace host poses for photographs with the outdoor remembrance display

In Hampton Court’s East Front Gardens 75 giant poppy wreaths have been placed alongside 100 Tommies and 25 Indian soldiers to represent forces from across the Empire

The figures were made out of scrap hoardings collected by Mr Barton, who has been creating the silhouettes for years

The display created as part of the ‘Standing with Giants’ project is to represent almost 1800 Indian soldiers who sailed to Britain in 1919 to take part in the World War I peace parade in London and were encamped on the grounds of Hampton Court for the duration of their stay

The silhouettes are dotted along the manicured lawn in a solemn display to remember those who died in the war

Moving extracts from letters written to home by soldiers on the front line surround the silhouettes

One Indian fighter wrote: ‘It is very hard to endure the bombs, Father. It will be difficult for anyone to survive and come back safe and sound from the war’

Moving extracts from letters written to home by soldiers on the front line surround the silhouettes.

An Indian fighter wrote: ‘It is very hard to endure the bombs, Father. It will be difficult for anyone to survive and come back safe and sound from the war.’

In his final letter home to his wife, one Briton wrote: ‘We are going over the top this afternoon and only God in Heaven knows who will come out of it alive.

‘I go to Him with your dear face the last vision on Earth I shall see and your name upon my lips, you the best of women.

‘You will look after my darling bairns for me and tell them how their daddy died.’

Mr Barton works in a shed constructed from pallets covered in tarpaulin, and hopes to take thousands more silhouettes to 20 mobile exhibitions around the UK. 

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