Builders and transport workers are among least likely trades to have had a Covid booster, latest figures show

  • An estimated 39.8 per cent of skilled builders in England have had an extra dose
  • People in what are classed as the ‘elementary trades’ have the lowest take-up 
  • Occupations with the highest take-up were health professionals at 75.3 per cent

Builders and transport workers are among the least likely trades to have had a Covid booster, latest figures show.

An estimated 39.8 per cent of employees in skilled construction and building trades in England have had an extra dose, along with 42.6 per cent of plant and machine operatives and 43.9 per cent of transport and mobile machine drivers and operatives.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures, published on Friday, suggest that people in what are classed as ‘elementary trades and related occupations’ – such as packers, bottlers, industrial cleaning or farm and forestry workers – have the lowest take-up at 37 per cent.

An estimated 39.8 per cent of employees in skilled construction and building trades in England have had an extra dose (builder stock image)

Along with 42.6 per cent of plant and machine operatives and 43.9 per cent of transport and mobile machine drivers and operatives (transport stock image)

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures, published on Friday, suggest that people in what are classed as ‘elementary trades and related occupations’ have the lowest take-up at 37 per cent (farm worker stock image)

This is followed by skilled construction and building trades at 39.8 per cent.

These occupations also had the highest proportion of people that had not received a first jab, at 14.5 per cent and 12 per cent respectively.

Occupations with the highest take-up were health professionals at 75.3 per cent, health and social care associate professionals at 58.7 per cent, and those working in secretarial and related jobs at 58.4 per cent.

The figures are based on vaccinations delivered up to December 12 for adults in England aged 40 to 64, before Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced the new target of offering boosters to all adults who want one by the end of the month.

This means that the figures may reflect the order in which people became eligible for a booster or third dose of the vaccine. 

Jabs were initially prioritised for older and vulnerable people before being extended to younger age groups.

Around a third of sports players in England are estimated to have received a booster or third dose of Covid-19 vaccine as of December 12.

Other specific occupations with low take-up so far of extra doses include plasterers (33.3 per cent), waiters and waitresses (33.4 per cent), chefs (35 per cent), bar staff (36.6 per cent), fork-lift truck drivers (37.6 per cent) and vehicle technicians and mechanics (38.2 per cent).

This is followed by skilled construction and building trades at 39.8 per cent (doctor stock image)

Some of these groups also have the highest estimates for people who have received no vaccine at all, such as waiters and waitresses (15.3 per cent), fork-lift truck drivers (14 per cent) and bar staff (13.2 per cent).

Among other occupations with high levels of unvaccinated workers are fitness instructors (17.4 per cent), actors, entertainers and presenters (14.9 per cent), security guards (13.2 per cent), and cleaners and domestics (12.6 per cent).

A separate release by the ONS suggests that the lowest third dose and booster take up in England was among people aged 50 and over in the Pakistani (42.2 per cent), Black Caribbean (44.4 per cent) and Black African (45.4 per cent) groups.

More than a quarter (25.2 per cent) of people of Black Caribbean ethnicity are estimated to not have received a first Covid vaccine dose up to December 12 – the highest proportion of all ethnic groups.

Muslims were the least likely religious group to have received a booster or third dose (46.3 per cent).

These occupations also had the highest proportion of people that had not received a first jab, at 14.5 per cent and 12 per cent respectively (social worker stock image)

Occupations with the highest take-up were health professionals at 75.3 per cent, health and social care associate professionals at 58.7 per cent, and those working in secretarial and related jobs at 58.4 per cent (secretary stock image)

Take-up was lower among people living in more deprived areas, those who have never worked or are long-term unemployed, those without qualifications and those who do not own their own home, compared to more-advantaged groups.

It was higher among non-disabled people, compared to those who said their day-to-day activities are limited ‘a little’ or ‘a lot’.

Dr Chaand Nagpaul, council chair at the British Medical Association, told BBC Radio 4’s World at One: ‘This is deeply worrying because in many ways I fear a repetition of what happened in the first wave, where… we saw this rather alarming and disturbing disparity in illness and deaths amongst ethnic minorities from Covid.

‘What we know now of course is that the patients, people who are becoming seriously ill, who are being hospitalised, are those who have not been vaccinated and those who have not had their boosters.

‘Eighty per cent of patients in some ICUs are those who have not been vaccinated.’

Low booster take-up in ethnic groups is deeply worrying, says senior medic

People from Pakistani, Caribbean and African backgrounds have the lowest rates for receiving a booster or third dose of Covid-19 vaccine, new data suggests.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures suggest that the lowest third dose and booster take-up among people aged 50 and over in England was in the Pakistani (42.2 per cent), black Caribbean (44.4 per cent) and black African (45.4 per cent) groups.

More than a quarter of people of black Caribbean ethnicity are estimated to not have received a first Covid vaccine dose up to December 12 – the highest proportion of all ethnic groups.

A senior medic said that the figures, which were published on Friday, were ‘deeply worrying’. Pictured: Dr Chaand Nagpaul

A senior medic said that the figures, which were published on Friday, were ‘deeply worrying’.

Dr Chaand Nagpaul, council chair at the British Medical Association, told BBC Radio 4’s World at One: ‘This is deeply worrying because in many ways I fear a repetition of what happened in the first wave, where… we saw this rather alarming and disturbing disparity in illness and deaths amongst ethnic minorities from Covid.

‘What we know now of course is that the patients, people who are becoming seriously ill, who are being hospitalised, are those who have not been vaccinated and those who have not had their boosters.

‘Eighty per cent of patients in some ICUs are those who have not been vaccinated.’

Muslims were the least likely religious group to have received a booster or third dose (46.3 per cent), the ONS said.

The ONS also said that take-up was lower among people living in more deprived areas, those who have never worked or are long-term unemployed, those without qualifications and those who do not own their own home, compared to more-advantaged groups.

Take-up was higher among non-disabled people, compared to those who said their day-to-day activities are limited ‘a little’ or ‘a lot’.

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